Now Playing Tracks

distant-traveller:

The Horsehead nebula from blue to infrared

One of the most identifiable nebulae in the sky, the Horsehead Nebula in Orion, is part of a large, dark, molecular cloud. Also known as Barnard 33, the unusual shape was first discovered on aphotographic plate in the late 1800s. The red glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust, although the lower part of the Horsehead’s neck casts a shadow to the left. Streams of gas leaving the nebula are funneled by a strong magnetic field. Bright spots in the Horsehead Nebula’s base are young stars just in the process of forming. Light takes about 1,500 years to reach us from the Horsehead Nebula. The above image is a digital combination of images taken in blue, green, red, and hydrogen-alpha light from the Argentina, and an image taken in infrared light by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope.

Image credit & copyright: Optical: Aldo Mottino & Carlos Colazo, OAC, Córdoba; Infrared: Hubble Legacy Archive

astronomy-to-zoology:

Genus: Gigantactis

is a genus of Whipnose Anglers (Gigantactinidae) which occur in most oceans, at deep depths of around 1,000-2,500 meters (3,300-8,200 ft). Like their namesake suggests members of Gigantactis posses elongated Illicium (their “lures”) with bioluminescent photophores at their end. In typical angler fashion these are used to lure prey into striking distance. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Actinopterygii-Lophiiformes-Gigantactinidae-Gigantactis

Image: Theodore W. Pietsch 

astronomy-to-zoology:

Snowberry Clearwing (Hemaris diffinis)
…is a species of “Hummingbird” Sphinx Moth (Sphingidae) which is widely distributed throughout North America. Adult snowberry clearwings are often seen in flowery fields during the day where they will feed, like the hummingbirds they are named after, on nectar from flowers. Snowberry clearwings are typically seen flying from March to September, however this season can be shorter the north north they occur. Snowberry clearwings will have two generations per year. With caterpillars feeding on dogbane, honeysuckle, and of course snowberry. 
Classification
Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Bombycoidea-Sphingidae-Macroglossinae-Dilophonotini-Hemaris-H. diffinis
Images: Cody Hough and Lonnie Huffman
Zoom Info

astronomy-to-zoology:

Snowberry Clearwing (Hemaris diffinis)

…is a species of “Hummingbird” Sphinx Moth (Sphingidae) which is widely distributed throughout North America. Adult snowberry clearwings are often seen in flowery fields during the day where they will feed, like the hummingbirds they are named after, on nectar from flowers. Snowberry clearwings are typically seen flying from March to September, however this season can be shorter the north north they occur. Snowberry clearwings will have two generations per year. With caterpillars feeding on dogbane, honeysuckle, and of course snowberry. 

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Bombycoidea-Sphingidae-Macroglossinae-Dilophonotini-Hemaris-H. diffinis

Images: Cody Hough and Lonnie Huffman

astronomy-to-zoology:

White-flannel Moth (Norape ovina)

…a species of Flannel Moth (Megalopygidae) which occurs in the southern United States south into South America. Adult white-flannel moths are typically on the wing from April to May and in some places July to October. They typically have two generations per year thorough most of their range, although hit is likely there are more in the southern areas of their range. White-flannel moth caterpillars are known to feed on Hackberry and Redbud.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Insecta-Lepidoptera-Zygaenoidea-Megalopygidae-Norape-N. ovina

Image: ©John Pickering

sinobug:

Mantisfly (Entanoneura sinica, Mantispidae, Neuroptera)

These extraordinary, seemingly prehistoric insects belong to the same order of insects as lacewings and owlflies. They get their name from their mantis-like appearance, as their spiny “raptorial” front legs are modified to catch small insect prey and are very similar to the front legs of mantids. The adults are predatory insects that are often nocturnal.

Mantis Fly (Entanoneura sinica, Mantispidae, Neuroptera)

The larvae of the subfamily Mantispinae (to which this individual belongs) seek out female spiders or their egg sacs which they then enter; the scarabaeiform larvae then feed on the spider eggs, draining egg contents through a piercing/sucking tube formed by modified mandibles and maxillae, pupating in the egg sac.
First-instar mantispids use two strategies to locate spider eggs: larvae may burrow directly through the silk of egg sacs they find, or they may board and be carried by female spiders prior to sac production, entering the sac as it is being constructed.

(attracted to MV night light)

by Sinobug (itchydogimages) on Flickr.
Pu’er, Yunnan, China

See more Chinese insects and spiders on my Flickr site HERE……

To Tumblr, Love Pixel Union